Sharing the Story

You can find us at conferences, read our published papers, and delve into what is learned.

Here are a few examples of projects we have supported:

San Francisco State University – Student Enrichment Opportunities

The SEO programs are designed to prepare students from underrepresented groups for biomedical careers by providing academic support and stimulating research experiences.

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UMass – IGERT Offshore Wind Energy Program

Our goal is to create a community of researchers who understand the technological challenges, environmental implications, socioeconomic, and regulatory hurdles of offshore wind farms.

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Stanford University – Epicenter

Epicenter was funded by the National Science Foundation from 2011 to 2016 and directed by Stanford University and VentureWell. Epicenter's mission was to empower U.S. undergraduate engineering students to bring their ideas to life for the benefit of our economy and society.

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Tufts University – Soft Material Robotics

Robots. Artificial Creatures. How will new machines change our lives? How will we change our machines?

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ECEP – Expanding Computing Education Pathways

Computer science is one of the fastest growing occupational fields, yet the number of students being trained in computing won’t meet the projected demand. The Expanding Computing Education Pathways (ECEP) Alliance seeks to increase the number and diversity of students in the pipeline to computing and computing-intensive degrees by supporting state-level computing education reforms.

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Tulane University – Bioinnovation

The pathway to biomedical innovation is marked by four cornerstones: observation, conceptualization, experimentation and implementation. At Tulane University the interdisciplinary Bioinnovation PhD Program fast-tracks students through this process. Here, an entrepreneurial bend to the traditional academic research enterprise generates practical biomedical breakthroughs geared for the medical marketplace.

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UMASS – Initiative for Maximizing Student Development

The IMSD program provides numerous professional development opportunities, including year-round research experiences in laboratories at UMass Boston, Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center or other local institutions, research skills training, biomedical career development workshops, journal club, intensive mentoring and advising, networking opportunities, travel to scientific conferences, and the benefits of being part of a community of scientists.

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Greenfield Community College – SAGE – Sustainable Agriculture & Green Energy Education Center

SAGE‘s Mission is to educate and train students and community members in sustainable agriculture, renewable energy and energy efficiency. SAGE serves as a hub for professional development and community engagement. SAGE fosters active citizen participation in food and energy decision-making and production. The Time to Act is Now.

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Northeastern University – PROTECT – Puerto Rico Testsite for Exploring Contamination Threats

Supported with funding from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences’ Superfund Research Program, the PROTECT Center studies exposure to environmental contamination in Puerto Rico and its contribution to preterm birth (less than 37 completed weeks of gestation). In Puerto Rico, the preterm birth rate is 11.8% of live births. Preterm birth is the leading cause of neonatal mortality in the U.S., and is associated with chronic health conditions and developmental disabilities that cause lifelong consequences.

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Duke University – BOOST – Building Opportunities and Overtures in Science and Technology

BOOST (Building Opportunities and Overtures in Science and Technology) is a multidimensional program is designed to excite young people – particularly underrepresented minorities, girls, and kids from economically challenged backgrounds – about science and inspire them to pursue careers in medicine and related fields. BOOST is funded through a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Science Education Partnership Award.

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Rutgers University – The Garden State LSAMP

The Garden State LSAMP (Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation) program, is a non-medical science program initiated by the National Science Foundation. The LSAMP program was designed to greatly increase the number of professionals in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) fields from minority groups who are traditionally underrepresented. The program provides support services at many levels to help interested students be successful in STEM majors.

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Dartmouth University – EPSCoR Attention Consortium

It improves the productivity of workers, affects the safety of roads and drivers, and impacts the vigilance of military and security personnel. But how does it work?

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