What innovations, products and resources created by ATE centers continue to influence technician education after center funding ends?

The ATE program has made significant investments into national, regional and resource centers to promote collaborations of community colleges and the scaling and sustainability of advanced technological education at community colleges that educate students for participation in the high technology workforce.  Many of these centers lasted many years over several funding cycles, often starting out as regional centers before scaling up nationally. 

This project will explore the legacy of ATE centers by investigating which ideas, innovations, knowledge and products developed by the center that continue to evolve and be used. This project will ask 8 of the ATE centers that have concluded over the last 10 years (of which there are 15), to provide an “epilogue” to their final report using a common reporting template, and to participate in a structured interview.

Approach:

  1. Develop an Epilogue to the final report for 8 ATE centers focusing on scale and sustainability
  2. Identify themes across 8 centers to illustrate how the value of an ATE center is scaled and/or sustained.
    1. Review existing documentation
    2. Interviews
  3. Testimony and verification from external sources

Value:

  1. Current PIs learn from their predecessors
  2. Proposers plan for scale & sustainability
  3. Prepare reviewers to better judge proposals
  4. Support evaluation & documentation of impacts
  5. Uncover the potential impact and possible limitations of a center-based approach to education

Request for Applications for Participation

The ATE program has made significant investments into national, regional and resource centers to promote collaborations of community colleges and the scaling and sustainability of advanced technological education at community colleges that educate students for participation in the high technology workforce.  Many of these centers lasted many years over several funding cycles, often starting out as regional centers before scaling up nationally. The driving question behind this research project is:

What innovations, products and resources created by ATE centers continue to influence technician education after center funding ends?

This project will explore the legacy of eight ATE centers by investigating which ideas, innovations, knowledge and products developed by the center that continue to evolve and be used.  We’re particularly interested in stories of success, scale and spread that might not be reported through traditional means under/after the grant.

Due date: November 9, 2018

Eligible centers: Any center that has had NSF ATE funding in the last 10 years, but for whom center funding has since concluded. Each center will identify one innovation worth deeper exploration. Innovations may include curriculum, materials, pedagogy, relationships, collaborations, K-12 outreach, networks, Professional development, conferences, industry partnerships etc.  We are interested in those that successfully scaled and/or sustained and those that may have failed.

Compensation: up to $5,000 over the two years of the research effort to cover the time required to gather materials and reports, participate in interviews with the research team and review final products.

Expectations: In conjunction with the research team one innovation would be identified for exploration.  Participants in this study would provide the study team with:

  • Proposal documents
  • Annual reports
  • Evaluation reports
  • Website materials
  • Two interviews with the PI and possibly additional team members as necessary
  • A written report following a template (the Epilogue report)
  • Feedback on all final products
  • Candor and a willingness to reflect deeply on success and failures!